file-20200423-47820-11ub8dp

One of Ana Maria Hidalgo’s first moves, immediately after her re-election as mayor of Paris, was the confirmation of the 50 kilometres of cycle paths created in the city during the lockdown. It was precisely during the lockdown that the elections for the run-off were to take place, in which the mayor started with a slight advantage; postponed until June 28th, they became also and above all a vote on her management of the city during the emergency period. But the policy that has made Paris today one of the most “bike-friendly” cities in the world, with videos of rivers of bicycles that filled up social medias, certainly does not look like an improvisation or a green conversion occurred during quarantine, and instead fits perfectly into the overall picture of the transformation process of the city that began in 2014, with the first mandate by Hidalgo: the Coronavirus has acted as an accelerator to the ambition of drastically reducing motorised vehicles in the French capital, up to imposing a limit of 30 miles per hour on the périphérique. After all, in a metropolitan area that exceeds twelve million inhabitants, only two million elect the mayor, the Parisians who live within the borders of the ville lumière, and only just over 30% of them own a car.

Loading...